BACKGROUND

A street address has more significance than many people realise. An address specifies a point of service delivery and makes the city function better for everyone. It is essential for electricity, water, refuse, sewage, emergency services, land ownership, parcel deliveries and countless other critical services and functions. Without a street address and a location, cities cannot look after their citizens effectively.

A street address is also part of a citizen’s identity too. Many people with exactly the same names are differentiated through their addresses.

    BACKGROUND
    DEFINITION
    BENEFITS OF STREET ADDRESSES
    COJ STREET ADDRESSES
    STREET ADDRESSES AND THE LAW
    BRIEFING SESSION PRESENTATIONS

    DEFINITION

    A street address is an indicator of location. The traditional street address consists of at least a street number and street name plus the township/suburb name.According to the South African address standard (SANS 1883) a street address is one of twelve address types, namely: street address, building address, intersection address, site address, five types of SA Post Office addresses, landmark address, farm address and informal address.

    Synonyms of street address:

    • Physical street address
    • Physical address
    • Geographic address.

    BENEFITS OF STREET ADDRESSES

    An address unambiguously specifies a point of service delivery:

    • Physical addresses assist in achieving national development objectives for service delivery.
    • Physical addresses are the building blocks of society and a well-developed address infrastructure stimulates socio-economic development.  A physical address is the key to participate fully in economic, political and civil society.
    • An address has become an identity element of a very unique sort.  Many institutions have adopted the individual’s street address as an identity proof element, distinguishing one individual from others.  Often street addresses are used for validations and cross verifications.

    Other critical services and functions that can be hugely improved by a street address include:

    • Telecommunications
    • Emergency services (an ambulance – can save a life)
    • Door door-to to-door parcel delivery (postal, courier, medicine, etc.)
    • Risk management and insurance calculations
    • Environmental management
    • Land ownership
    • Routing and route optimisation
    • Finding people and places (including GPS directions)
    • Catalyst for economic growth, funding and loans
    • Surveys
    • Health services planning
    • Elections
    • Service delivery planning and resource optimisation
    • Advertising and targeted marketing
    • Where people have the same names, location can be used as a unique identifier
    • Area profiling for e.g. consumer patterns, demographics, health , etc.

    COJ STREET ADDRESSES

    • The City of Johannesburg’s Planning Department allocates street addresses to new properties (stands) that come into existence, whether through township establishment, sub-division or consolidation.
    • Properties are demarcated (surveyed) by the Surveyor General and registered in the Deeds Office where a Title Deed is issued as proof of ownership.
    • Street addresses have been identified as one of the key property datasets within the City’s Land Information System (LIS).  Address data is crucial for the Planning, Valuation, and Rates & Taxes Departments, amongst others.

    FURTHER READING:

      STREET ADDRESSES AND THE LAW

      • The Local Government Ordinance 17 of 1939 specifies that owners should display street addresses and that costs are borne by the property owner/resident. Street numbers must face the street from where entrance is gained to the property and numbers should not be smaller than 75mm in height.
      • The Property Rates Act (No.6 of 2004) stipulates that a street address must be included in the Valuation Roll for all properties.
      • The proof of physical addresses is also one of the requirements of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act (FICA) 38 of 2001 in conjunction with the National Credit Act that came into effect on 1 June 2007.
      • The IEC’s Voter’s Roll should include voter’s physical addresses to be consistent with the rule of law and to say with confidence that they were entitled to voting in the specific wards.
      • The Spatial Data Infrastructure Act (54 of 2003) promotes the maintenance, use and sharing of spatial information, which therefore includes address data.

      BRIEFING SESSION PRESENTATIONS